The First German Monument to the Beloved Brat

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March 14, 2014 by Prost Brewing

"Rostbrater" roasting Thuringian Brats; Courtesy of: Matthias Under the License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en.

“Rostbrater” roasting Thuringian Brats; Courtesy of: Matthias Under the License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en.

You are probably well aware, especially if you read the last blog post, of the Germans’ obsession over bratwursts. In almost every German city, village, or town, you will find a unique style of brat that is particular to that specific place. They are considered to be the perfect afternoon snack, the protein-filled breakfast to power you through the day, and of course, are the go-to nibble to accompany any authentic German brew.

A visit to Germany and you would likely spot a bratwurst with every turn of your neck. What you might not expect to spot as you roam through the streets of Germany is a two meter high wooden monument of a bratwurst in a bun on a local traffic roundabout in the village of Holzhausen. Equally stunning, is that this moment was erected to mark the “Erstes Deutsches Bratwurstmuseum” translated to the “First German Bratwurst Museum.” Yes, you read that correctly! Filled with passion for their grilled brats, a most important association known as the “Friends of Thuringian Bratwurst” decided to pay tribute to their beloved food that has brought pleasure into their village for centuries by erecting a bratwurst museum.

Thuringian Brat; Photo Courtesy of: barfisch

Thuringian Brat; Photo Courtesy of: barfisch Under the license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en.

Unlike the brats described in the last blog post, the Thuringian sausage is not from the region of Franconia, where the oldest documented evidence of a brat in Germany was found. Instead, Thuringian sausage is, in accordance with its name, from the German state of Thuringia. Its history extends to the year 1404, almost as far back as the oldest known brats of Germany. The first description of the sausage appears in a transcript of a bill from an Arnstadt convent, a convent that apparently enjoyed their brats as well! Today, the brats are found throughout Thuringia, either roasted over charcoal or placed on a grill rubbed with bacon. When the grill needs to be cooled, a hefty dose of beer is poured over it, adding some extra flavoring for the next go round of brats!

At Prost, we may not have Thuringian brats with a recipe that dates back to 1613, but we have some of the Colorado Front Range’s best brats served every day we open our doors. If you have not yet gotten a taste, head down to Prost to experience one of the most basic and essential German traditions, that of the beer and brat. Be careful though as too many brats and biers may cause you to fantasize about building your own monument of the beloved Brat! You might just find yourself thinking that those Germans aren’t so crazy after all….

Another “Prost!” to the authentic German bier and brat, a combination guaranteed to take you to higher places as it has done in Germany for centuries!

Prost!

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